Uncategorized

Day twenty-two.

How have you changed in the past two years?

I’ve come into my identity a lot more. When I was in high school, I didn’t really believe that I was autistic because there was still the ‘real autism’ debate going on within my circles and in the general community. It was a possibility but it was so hard to tell from the outside after years of adaptation to the neurotypical world that even I doubted myself.

Now, I know that there are thousands of women just like me, who are experiencing the same struggles and successes even without the formal diagnosis we all long for. So I feel a lot more solid about what’s part of that and what isn’t, and I try to improve myself daily either way.

When I was a senior in high school, I thought that I was going into the theatrical business. Now I’m just going into business, but with the same end goal of working in the theme park industry.

I used to be a lot less involved with things. Now, I at least have a few friends to rely on and a few places to go when I need them. I’ve become more of a loner in general, but I’m at least happy and confident about it.

I now speak three languages instead of only one and a half, which is very, very nice.

I guess I’m still a work-in-progress. I’m not terribly proud of who I am, but I am excited to see where I go in the future.

~Sam

Advertisements
Standard
Uncategorized

Day twenty-one.

One of your favourite shows.

Saturday Night Live. It’s a decent brand of humor that’s changed a bit through the past 40 years but is still surprisingly relatable. I bought a Hulu subscription JUST so I could binge-watch. Here’s hoping someone gets the rights for seasons 6-29 back soon…

~Sam

Standard
Uncategorized

Day twenty.

How important you think education is.

It’s insanely important. If I hadn’t gone on to college out here, I would have stayed in the tiny, opportunity-less town I grew up in, probably working for minimum while living at home. Or I would have ended up pregnant and married and probably still working more than full-time. But evenĀ that plight pales in comparison to that of uneducated people in other countries.

Education frees people from the cycle of poverty and it allows girls and women the opportunity to make their own choices in life. There are little girls who are 10 or 12 years old, getting married, having babies, being raped by their own ‘husbands’ while at the same time having their intelligence and potential stomped to the ground by the society they live in. In some countries, a girl trying to go to school will be SHOT IN THE HEAD by men who believe that women need not be educated. This is beyond ‘not okay’.

So, yes, we should probably start focusing on making sure that every boy and girl in the US is given a decent education, including a comprehensive sexual education, so as to prevent the cyclical nature of teen motherhood that is all but a plague where I came from and in many other places.

But we should also be championing the rights of the girl child worldwide, because Malala Yousafzai and every girl worldwide deserve access to a decent education and life without fear of retribution from extremists bent on making sure that they will not.

Enough soapboxing for today.

~Sam

Standard